Ignorance about Colorado laws and realities on ending a marriage can keep lead to bad decisions or keep spouses in an unhappy marriage. Clearing up misconceptions about divorce can help with informed decision-making.

First, courts do not always award child custody to the mother. The best interest of the child determine which parent receives custody. The spouse who is the main caretaker is more likely to obtain custody to avoid disruption in the child’s life.

Filing for divorce may not end the stress and arguing that occurred during marriage. A spouse may be disruptive because separation lowered their standard of living. Parents may continue arguments that started in their marriage over the children after the divorce is final. In fact, these may become more intense as the parents fight over visitation.

It is also wrong to assume that spousal support is always awarded to the woman. With more frequency, women make more money and earn more than their male spouses. Each spouse’s income instead of their gender is considered by the court.

More men are being awarded spousal support, if they stayed home to take care of the couple’s children. They may continue to receive until they restart their careers or may even continue to take care of their children at home after the divorce is final.

Separate accounts and placing names on assets may not always protect spouses during property division. In Colorado, courts divide assets and money earned during marriage in a manner they consider as being equal or fair regardless of the name or identity on an account or piece of property.

A lawyer can help a spouse begin the planning for divorce and candidly discuss their options under Colorado law. Legal representation may help assure that their rights are protected during settlement negotiations or court proceedings.